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This case study explores the various dimensions and challenges surrounding the 2022 World Cup in Qatar. The case emphasizes multiple pillars of sustainability. 

Qatar has received much attention since winning the bid to host the 2022 World Cup, and not all of the attention has been positive.

This case addresses the development of the Jiuquan Wind Farm in China. Readers will make a decision on the future of Chinese wind power investment, given the technical, financial, and environmental challenges facing large-scale renewable energy. 

In China’s 12th Five Year Plan (2011-2015), the central government outlines ambitious targets for expanding domestic wind power generation.

In this case, the definition of sustainable is based on how the energy is produced and does not consider public or environmental prosperity. Through this we see that just because something carries the label of sustainable development, it doesn’t make it a good thing— it can make many relevant actors worse off than they were before. This case brings the reader to consider how varied motivations for implementing a sustainable development project may not always be environmental protection.

Chief Minister Taib has set in place a massive sustainable dam project (SCORE) to increase energy production throughout Malaysia and develop Sarawak’s economy by bringing foreign industrial investm

This case presents a macro view of the decision-making process that Kenya’s Ministry of Energy underwent to address recurrent blackouts in Nairobi specifically, and the remainder of Kenya, generally.

The case discusses the acceptance and implementation of the Nairobi Metropolitan Transmission Ring (NMR) as one solution to address Kenya’s electricity supply issues.

This case is designed to illustrate the challenges associated with urban infrastructure development as they relate to the transportation sector and public-private partnerships (PPPs). Jakarta’s monorail provides an excellent example of the trials and tribulations facing decision makers in this context. Resolving infrastructure logjams in developing countries is messy: local institutions cannot always manage a transparent and competitive bidding process, while the range of bidders is constrained by the existing vested interests in the public and private sectors. The prospects for a sustainable solution may be limited in this context. However, in a difficult business environment, certain PPP structures can still succeed with strong government support and a robust risk mitigation strategy. Given all of the complexity in developing countries, strong political leadership and the strategic alignment of actors and interests can produce results, imperfect as these results may be. For now, Mr. Soeryadjaya’s eagerness to tap into Jakarta’s infrastructure market and public support for public transit have placed the monorail project on solid ground.

Jakarta, Indonesia contains at least 9 million people and constitutes nearly one-fifth of Indonesia’s GDP. This metropolis is hamstrung by a sclerotic transportation system.

Changes in São Paulo’s rainfall patterns and increased usage from growing urbanization have greatly stressed water availability. Historically low dam levels in the Cantareira system have prompted calls for the government to ration water, however the upcoming elections have compelled the government to pursue other demand and supply side options. With the 2014 World Cup approaching its opening in São Paulo, the government faces both local and international pressure to alleviate its scarcity issues permanently, with a few financial and political costs as possible. 

The Brazilian city of São Paulo, capital of the State of São Paulo and Brazil’s largest metropolitan area, currently faces its most severe drought in decades.

This two-day simulation focuses on the negotiation of controversial and complex issues related to the 2,000-mile border that separates and joins the United States and Mexico as neighbors. Originally designed for an Introduction to Latin American & Latino Studies course, the simulation can also be used in other academic settings to highlight the complexity of international negotiations, to help students identify with a non-U.S. perspective, and/or to showcase the practical and emotional implications of theoretical foreign policy.

This two-day simulation focuses on the negotiation of controversial and complex issues related to the 2,000-mile border that separates and joins the United States and Mexico as neighbors.

This case study focuses on the rollout of an ambitious bio-toilet initiative by the CEO of one of New Delhi’s civic bodies to tackle the problem of poor sanitation in the city’s slums. Many competing and complex factors come into play when attempting to develop new infrastructure at scale.

India’s economic reforms of the 1990s have led to an exponential growth in industrial and commercial activities, which in turn has led to rapid urbanization.

This case serves as a basis for class discussion of why good policy ideas might fail to be implemented or taken up on the agenda. Dr. Viau’s perspective allows students to consider the strategic planning and framing necessary in developing, presenting, and advocating a policy idea in a complex environment.

Dr. Albert Viau has developed a national physician’s assistant program to help solve the problem of rural health service delivery in Republica, a mountainous Central American country.