Case Study Search

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This case study uses the Maboneng Precinct, a mixed-use creative hub in downtown Johannesburg, to understand better the role of a private sector developer in urban development and to explore the concepts of urban regeneration, gentrification, and sustainability. 

Until the 1970s, Johannesburg’s Central Business District (CBD) was the economic center of South Africa and, arguably, of the entire African continent.

This case analyzes the challenges facing PANDA, a private-sector interest group, as they decide how to move forward in a complex political environment. Students must keep in mind the nature of the political regime in Pandora, the various components and goals of PANDA, and the relative positions of other political stakeholders.

Mahiz Shewen is the president of the Pandoran Development Authority (PANDA), a group of private sector leaders with civic action interests in the Southeast Asian republic of Pandora.

An environmental role-play in which a multi-party committee employs a negotiated rule making process to achieve consensus.  Recommended for students already introduced to negotiation and who have background in economics and management dilemmas.

Woodstove Source Performance Standards is an environmental role-play in which a multi-party committee employs a negotiated rulemaking process to achieve consensus regarding woodstove emissions.

This case study explores the various dimensions and challenges of developing Baja California state’s first wind farm and illustrates the energy dilemma faced by a region experiencing high electricity costs due to climate, detachment from the national grid, and an incompatible national energy regulatory structure. The case addresses multiple pillars of sustainability.
 

The case study chronicles the development of Baja California state’s first wind farm and illustrates the energy dilemma faced by a region experiencing high electricity costs due to climate, detachm

This case explores the Brazilian city of Curitiba in its pursuit of sustainability through urban planning and development, referencing flood management control, recycling programs, and bus rapid transit specifically.

Curitiba is a well-known flagship of sustainable urban development and progressive land use planning.

This case is designed to illustrate the challenges associated with urban infrastructure development as they relate to the transportation sector and public-private partnerships (PPPs). Jakarta’s monorail provides an excellent example of the trials and tribulations facing decision makers in this context. Resolving infrastructure logjams in developing countries is messy: local institutions cannot always manage a transparent and competitive bidding process, while the range of bidders is constrained by the existing vested interests in the public and private sectors. The prospects for a sustainable solution may be limited in this context. However, in a difficult business environment, certain PPP structures can still succeed with strong government support and a robust risk mitigation strategy. Given all of the complexity in developing countries, strong political leadership and the strategic alignment of actors and interests can produce results, imperfect as these results may be. For now, Mr. Soeryadjaya’s eagerness to tap into Jakarta’s infrastructure market and public support for public transit have placed the monorail project on solid ground.

Jakarta, Indonesia contains at least 9 million people and constitutes nearly one-fifth of Indonesia’s GDP. This metropolis is hamstrung by a sclerotic transportation system.

This case explores the incentives guiding a P3 transit company in Abidjan, Cote d’Ivoire after the government (its primary stakeholders) collapses. As a main tool for post-conflict recovery, the company attempts to address growing needs around public transit as well as its own financial setbacks. 

SOTRA was created at the request of the Ivorian government on December 16, 1960 with a public-private concession agreement shortly after Côte d'Ivoire’s independence from France.

Technological advances in hydrofracturing have spurred an oil drilling frenzy around the town of Willston, ND. The community has seen it all before: oil executives arrive, drill, make promises about community development, but leave the town with nothing in the end. Will this boom be different?

Creating an environment for sustainable growth in a boomtown has been unsuccessful throughout history.

This case study explores flood management in Jakarta and its implications on the affected communities. The case highlights issues related to the role of key decision makers, hard and soft infrastructure solutions, interagency coordination, and mitigating the risks of resettlement. 

Jakarta is the largest urban center in Indonesia and faces frequent floods with growing intensity.

After 5 cyclist fatalities in 16 months, city leaders decided something needed to be done.

Bicycling and Coast City is a comprehensive case study based upon a fictionalized city on the central coast of a Western state.