Case Study Search

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The central theme of this case study is that cities facing drastically distinct development challenges may still pursue similar sustainable solutions. In pursuing the same objective of re-densification, the cities are considering similar strategies: rezoning and redefined land use, enhanced public transportation, and green urban infrastructure, to name a few. This case ends by prompting students to consider these strategies: which are the most important for achieving re-densification?

A shrinking Detroit and an expanding Guangzhou shape this case, which aims to introduce readers to the nuances of population density and the importance of redensification in sustainable urban plann

Rwanda has seen remarkable economic growth. However, food security remains a challenge in its rapidly modernizing capital city, Kigali. This case explores if an urban agriculture program can address the complex drivers of food insecurity in Kigali. 

This case evaluates the premade decision of the Kigali City Council (KCC) to incorporate urban agriculture into the city’s long-term development agenda, as the key tool to address the problem of fo

In this case, the definition of sustainable is based on how the energy is produced and does not consider public or environmental prosperity. Through this we see that just because something carries the label of sustainable development, it doesn’t make it a good thing— it can make many relevant actors worse off than they were before. This case brings the reader to consider how varied motivations for implementing a sustainable development project may not always be environmental protection.

Chief Minister Taib has set in place a massive sustainable dam project (SCORE) to increase energy production throughout Malaysia and develop Sarawak’s economy by bringing foreign industrial investm

This two-day simulation focuses on the negotiation of controversial and complex issues related to the 2,000-mile border that separates and joins the United States and Mexico as neighbors. Originally designed for an Introduction to Latin American & Latino Studies course, the simulation can also be used in other academic settings to highlight the complexity of international negotiations, to help students identify with a non-U.S. perspective, and/or to showcase the practical and emotional implications of theoretical foreign policy.

This two-day simulation focuses on the negotiation of controversial and complex issues related to the 2,000-mile border that separates and joins the United States and Mexico as neighbors.

The Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission combines the tribes' cultural heritage with modern science and public policy strategies in the following ways: build capacity, remain united, develop guiding principles, and leadership planning.

Four Native American tribes on the Columbia River are bringing back a salmon population decimated by irrigation, pollution, development and other forces.

Despite not holding a traditional leadership position, Denis Altvater works to reverse the poverty, school dropout rates, drug abuse and other damage done by hundreds of years of repression and prejudice; while preserving the Wabanaki Indian culture.

For the past decade, Denise Altvater and her colleagues have been reconnecting hundreds of Wabanaki youth with their culture, religion and traditions.

This leadership story demonstrates how angry and grief stricken families of people incarcerated under mandatory drug sentencing laws are mobilized to put a face on injustice and build diverse alliances to combat mandatory minimums.

Julie Stewart and her colleagues mobilize the angry and grief stricken families of people incarcerated under mandatory drug sentencing laws.

This story focuses on a coalition formed in the wake of the 1996 federal immigration policy reforms. This includes a shared approach to some service delivery as well as policy strategies and intentional development of new immigrant leaders.

Dale Asis and his colleagues have built a remarkable 19-member coalition in the wake of the 1996 federal immigration policy reforms.

Pressured by privatization, struggling bureau attempts jointly sponsored, multi-level cooperation. Illustrates dynamics and alternative strategies for labor-management dialog, and the role of union leaders and managers in solving workplace problems.

Organizational change is the focus of this case, which describes how labor and management come together in a cooperative rather than adversarial way in response to changing political and economic c

This is one of the best examples available of how a grassroots nonprofit evolves and develops, and how it recovers from opposition, missteps, and accidents that often destroy a good cause before it gets established.

This A and B case sequence traces the development of a nonprofit organization aimed at serving recent Hispanic immigrants in gaining access to day labor and staying out of immigration trouble.