Case Study Search

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This case urges the reader to consider the links between the competing priorities of sustainable development, infrastructure, and globalization using the Colombo Port Expansion Project (CPEP) as an example.

This case raises the question of whether infrastructure development can foster inclusive growth and poverty reduction for an entire population.

The central theme of this case study is that cities facing drastically distinct development challenges may still pursue similar sustainable solutions. In pursuing the same objective of re-densification, the cities are considering similar strategies: rezoning and redefined land use, enhanced public transportation, and green urban infrastructure, to name a few. This case ends by prompting students to consider these strategies: which are the most important for achieving re-densification?

A shrinking Detroit and an expanding Guangzhou shape this case, which aims to introduce readers to the nuances of population density and the importance of redensification in sustainable urban plann

Quito’s rapid income and population growth over the past several years has forced its mayor to address the problem of how its citizens efficiently commute throughout the city. The existing public transportation system can no longer accommodate the city’s growing population. As a result, Quito’s mayor is building the city’s first metro system, an ambitious project, which is not only constrained by economics, but also by the city’s physical characteristic, surrounded by the Andes.

Quito, the capital of Ecuador, is currently experiencing rapid economic development and population growth.

This case addresses the development of the Jiuquan Wind Farm in China. Readers will make a decision on the future of Chinese wind power investment, given the technical, financial, and environmental challenges facing large-scale renewable energy. 

In China’s 12th Five Year Plan (2011-2015), the central government outlines ambitious targets for expanding domestic wind power generation.

In this case, the definition of sustainable is based on how the energy is produced and does not consider public or environmental prosperity. Through this we see that just because something carries the label of sustainable development, it doesn’t make it a good thing— it can make many relevant actors worse off than they were before. This case brings the reader to consider how varied motivations for implementing a sustainable development project may not always be environmental protection.

Chief Minister Taib has set in place a massive sustainable dam project (SCORE) to increase energy production throughout Malaysia and develop Sarawak’s economy by bringing foreign industrial investm

A looming battle at the polls threatens two important civic projects, and leaders look for a way around the funding and political dilemma.

This case can be used to help students learn about the politics of tax initiatives as a tool for funding important community projects.

This case presents a macro view of the decision-making process that Kenya’s Ministry of Energy underwent to address recurrent blackouts in Nairobi specifically, and the remainder of Kenya, generally.

The case discusses the acceptance and implementation of the Nairobi Metropolitan Transmission Ring (NMR) as one solution to address Kenya’s electricity supply issues.

The dilemma facing a citizens' organization formed to support creation of a large new city park. The organization has developed many policy and advocacy options, and must now decide the best approach.

This teaching case presents the dilemma that faces the director of a local citizens' committee formed in support of the creation of a large new city park in downtown Seattle.

This case is designed to illustrate the challenges associated with urban infrastructure development as they relate to the transportation sector and public-private partnerships (PPPs). Jakarta’s monorail provides an excellent example of the trials and tribulations facing decision makers in this context. Resolving infrastructure logjams in developing countries is messy: local institutions cannot always manage a transparent and competitive bidding process, while the range of bidders is constrained by the existing vested interests in the public and private sectors. The prospects for a sustainable solution may be limited in this context. However, in a difficult business environment, certain PPP structures can still succeed with strong government support and a robust risk mitigation strategy. Given all of the complexity in developing countries, strong political leadership and the strategic alignment of actors and interests can produce results, imperfect as these results may be. For now, Mr. Soeryadjaya’s eagerness to tap into Jakarta’s infrastructure market and public support for public transit have placed the monorail project on solid ground.

Jakarta, Indonesia contains at least 9 million people and constitutes nearly one-fifth of Indonesia’s GDP. This metropolis is hamstrung by a sclerotic transportation system.

Should the consumer have the "right to know", or are nanotech food labels unnecessary and unhelpful? 

This cases poses a hypothetical debate over efforts at the U.S. state level to mandate labels on food products containing or packaged in materials containing engineered nanomaterials.