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With conflicts over development, environmental protection and economic growth heating up across the nation, and citizens groups everywhere becoming more organized, sophisticated and influential, this case's themes and issues are familiar even to people without any knowledge of or experience in land use and zoning. The conflicts have a ring of truth; the characterizations of the various interest groups and their initial concerns, needs, fears and positions are realistic and credible.

St. Joseph Shopping Mall is a role-play exercise in multi-party negotiations.

After Major League Soccer announced a plan to bring a team to Salt Lake City, the subsequent intergovernmental tensions with regard to funding and building a stadium caused the Major League Soccer to question their decision.

Major League Soccer announced plans to bring a team to Salt Lake City, Utah, and originally the organization announced plans to build a soccer stadium in downtown.

Grassroots leaders secured funding to build affordable housing, enabled immigrants to become U.S. citizens and created a welfare to work center for living-wage jobs. Through these efforts the community focused on leadership development.

The Sacramento Valley Organizing Community (SVOC) builds public power through public action.

This case follows Greg Nickels as he navigates how the King County Board of Health will address reporting individuals with HIV.

This case presents the challenges facing Greg Nickels, the chair of the King County Board of Health, who must decide how the board will address the issue of reporting individuals with Human Immunod

This two-day simulation focuses on the negotiation of controversial and complex issues related to the 2,000-mile border that separates and joins the United States and Mexico as neighbors. Originally designed for an Introduction to Latin American & Latino Studies course, the simulation can also be used in other academic settings to highlight the complexity of international negotiations, to help students identify with a non-U.S. perspective, and/or to showcase the practical and emotional implications of theoretical foreign policy.

This two-day simulation focuses on the negotiation of controversial and complex issues related to the 2,000-mile border that separates and joins the United States and Mexico as neighbors.

This leadership story demonstrates how angry and grief stricken families of people incarcerated under mandatory drug sentencing laws are mobilized to put a face on injustice and build diverse alliances to combat mandatory minimums.

Julie Stewart and her colleagues mobilize the angry and grief stricken families of people incarcerated under mandatory drug sentencing laws.

The case reveals the practical and ethical tensions inherent in many grassroots based advocacy organizations between sustaining the grassroots membership and supporting a professional staff who must effectively interact with the relevant policy elite.

A national Christian advocacy organization, dedicated to alleviating hunger worldwide, faces new dilemmas as it grows from a small, volunteer self defined "social movement" to a more powerful group

Multilateral role-play with lively internal dynamics and external relationships among corporate, state, local, and environmental interests. Students gain insight into conflict resolution by enacting an economic development/environmental conflict.

The primary teaching objective of this role-play is to give participants hands-on practice at working together to develop negotiation ground rules and to play out a negotiating strategy.

Synopsis:

Justice Christine Cahill (ret.) transplanted the FSI project from the University of Michigan Law School for implementation in King County, WA, by her organization, the Child Justice Advocacy Center (CJAC), which focuses on child welfare issues. Externally, the FSI relies on authorizers and referral partners with widely varying interests to refer cases and cooperate in addressing clients’ legal needs. Organizationally, the FSI is managed by Jennifer Clancy of the CJAC, which also employs and houses the social worker. Other project partners – the Washington Justice Center and the Parent Support Association – employ the remaining team partners and contract their services to the FSI project. Internally, the multi-disciplinary aspect of the team brings together professions not accustomed to collaboration to address and manage clients’ legal issues.

Jennifer Clancy, Project Director for the CJAC and protagonist of this case, implemented and supervises the project. As we meet Clancy, two social workers, two attorneys, and one parent ally have left the project in its short two-year history – a turnover rate of 167 percent. Upon the most recent departure, Clancy faces the decision to shut down the time-limited pilot or reengage stakeholders and modify aspects of governance and management to address deficiencies in communication and accountability that are impacting staff performance, engagement and satisfaction.

Jennifer Clancy, Project Director for the Child Justice Advocacy Center (CJAC) and protagonist of this case, implemented and supervises the Family Support Initiative (FSI) project.

Through this simulation students will experience the policymaking and implementation process firsthand. “Wolf Politics” is intended for use in a public policy- or environmental policy-oriented course.

Through this simulation students will experience the policymaking and implementation process firsthand.