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This case urges the reader to consider the links between the competing priorities of sustainable development, infrastructure, and globalization using the Colombo Port Expansion Project (CPEP) as an example.

This case raises the question of whether infrastructure development can foster inclusive growth and poverty reduction for an entire population.

This case provides an overview of the challenges facing the electricity sector in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, and explores various strategies implemented by Rio’s main electricity provider to overcome high non-technical loss rates.

Electricity theft represents a major problem in developing, emerging and even developed countries.

This case study uses the Maboneng Precinct, a mixed-use creative hub in downtown Johannesburg, to understand better the role of a private sector developer in urban development and to explore the concepts of urban regeneration, gentrification, and sustainability. 

Until the 1970s, Johannesburg’s Central Business District (CBD) was the economic center of South Africa and, arguably, of the entire African continent.

The central theme of this case study is that cities facing drastically distinct development challenges may still pursue similar sustainable solutions. In pursuing the same objective of re-densification, the cities are considering similar strategies: rezoning and redefined land use, enhanced public transportation, and green urban infrastructure, to name a few. This case ends by prompting students to consider these strategies: which are the most important for achieving re-densification?

A shrinking Detroit and an expanding Guangzhou shape this case, which aims to introduce readers to the nuances of population density and the importance of redensification in sustainable urban plann

In this case, the definition of sustainable is based on how the energy is produced and does not consider public or environmental prosperity. Through this we see that just because something carries the label of sustainable development, it doesn’t make it a good thing— it can make many relevant actors worse off than they were before. This case brings the reader to consider how varied motivations for implementing a sustainable development project may not always be environmental protection.

Chief Minister Taib has set in place a massive sustainable dam project (SCORE) to increase energy production throughout Malaysia and develop Sarawak’s economy by bringing foreign industrial investm

The overarching goal of this case is to step away, for a moment, from Payatas and comprehend the challenges of urban waste management in developing countries. These public health, environmental, and management problems are caused by various factors which constrain the development of effective solid waste management systems. With this mindset, students should be able to discuss how Payatas was able to overcome technical, financial, institutional, economic, and social constrains. 

Since 2001, the Payatas site in Quezon City, Metro Manila, has been transformed from an open dumpsite, into a controlled waste disposal facility, and recently into a sanitary landfill.

A recently appointed engineering commissioner in an urban building department is confronted with disconcerting allegations of unethical conduct by one of her supervisors. Students gain insight on handling highly visible and symbolic personnel issues and managing the situation to expedite valuable changes in department culture.

Students of public or personnel management will be challenged by this fast moving case study showing the sequential decisions made in a charged management situation.

Mr Modi, Indian PM candidate, leads the development of GIFT, a smart city and global finance hub with high quality of life and green infrastructure. Success for the GIFT PPP means balancing private and public interests.  Built from scratch, GIFT must attract industry and people to be sustainable.

GIFT, the Gujarat International Finance Tec-City, is a planned smart-city being designed and built in public-private partnership in the state of Gujarat, India.

This case study addresses issues related to water, sanitation, institutional capacity building, and storm water drainage. It analyzes efforts by the World Bank and DWASA to improve storm water drainage, institutional performance, and sewerage systems in Dhaka.

Dhaka is a megacity that faces many challenges.

This case, taking place in an urban transit system, provides an excellent vehicle for teaching about crisis management of circumstances. Difficult systems and cultural problems require attention, as do immediate safety and public confidence issues.

The "Express Maintenance" case examines a broken culture and formal and informal incentives that work against the mission and purpose of an urban bus system.