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Agency head develops strategic, inclusive budget process in response to drastic federal cutbacks. A powerful example of internal and external consensus building under extreme pressure, as well as insight into political aspects of good budgeting.

This is a highly versatile, rich case about a state social service agency executive facing major budget cutbacks who effectively uses negotiation and collaboration to build consensus for change ins

Synopsis:

Justice Christine Cahill (ret.) transplanted the FSI project from the University of Michigan Law School for implementation in King County, WA, by her organization, the Child Justice Advocacy Center (CJAC), which focuses on child welfare issues. Externally, the FSI relies on authorizers and referral partners with widely varying interests to refer cases and cooperate in addressing clients’ legal needs. Organizationally, the FSI is managed by Jennifer Clancy of the CJAC, which also employs and houses the social worker. Other project partners – the Washington Justice Center and the Parent Support Association – employ the remaining team partners and contract their services to the FSI project. Internally, the multi-disciplinary aspect of the team brings together professions not accustomed to collaboration to address and manage clients’ legal issues.

Jennifer Clancy, Project Director for the CJAC and protagonist of this case, implemented and supervises the project. As we meet Clancy, two social workers, two attorneys, and one parent ally have left the project in its short two-year history – a turnover rate of 167 percent. Upon the most recent departure, Clancy faces the decision to shut down the time-limited pilot or reengage stakeholders and modify aspects of governance and management to address deficiencies in communication and accountability that are impacting staff performance, engagement and satisfaction.

Jennifer Clancy, Project Director for the Child Justice Advocacy Center (CJAC) and protagonist of this case, implemented and supervises the Family Support Initiative (FSI) project.

The dilemmas and escalating crises facing a new executive director of a small, multipurpose nonprofit, plus the particular challenges of taking charge after a popular founder/executive director leaves. The case presented an overview of general management responsibilities and some basic principles of board management and staff relationships.

These teaching cases present dilemmas and escalating crises facing the new executive director of a small, multipurpose nonprofit organization.

This is one of the best examples available of how a grassroots nonprofit evolves and develops, and how it recovers from opposition, missteps, and accidents that often destroy a good cause before it gets established.

This A and B case sequence traces the development of a nonprofit organization aimed at serving recent Hispanic immigrants in gaining access to day labor and staying out of immigration trouble.

Examines accountability at several levels within social service and intergovernmental grant programs for 'special needs' children. Asks students to define problems carefully before offering solutions.

This case uses California's Adoption Assistance program, which subsidized the adoptive families of "hard to place" children, to examine accountability in social service and intergovernmental grant

The five mini-cases on ethics in managerial decision-making are intended to portray real life managerial dilemmas in a way that will help students develop frameworks for addressing those dilemmas.

The five mini-cases on ethics in managerial decision-making are intended to portray real life managerial dilemmas in a way that will help students develop frameworks for addressing those dilemmas.<

This case follows an ongoing leadership challenge within a small volunteer-dependent non-profit crisis support organization called the Corvallis Crisis Line (CCL), and the impact of poor management

Fostering Success launched an equity initiative to meet its ambitious goal of high school graduation parity in the surrounding county. A consultant led the agency through several required trainings and in starting an Equity Team. 

Early on, conflict emerged. Staff did not understand the purpose of equity training or see the connection to better outcomes for youth in foster care.