Case Study Search

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This two-day simulation focuses on the negotiation of controversial and complex issues related to the 2,000-mile border that separates and joins the United States and Mexico as neighbors. Originally designed for an Introduction to Latin American & Latino Studies course, the simulation can also be used in other academic settings to highlight the complexity of international negotiations, to help students identify with a non-U.S. perspective, and/or to showcase the practical and emotional implications of theoretical foreign policy.

This two-day simulation focuses on the negotiation of controversial and complex issues related to the 2,000-mile border that separates and joins the United States and Mexico as neighbors.

This case analyzes the challenges facing PANDA, a private-sector interest group, as they decide how to move forward in a complex political environment. Students must keep in mind the nature of the political regime in Pandora, the various components and goals of PANDA, and the relative positions of other political stakeholders.

Mahiz Shewen is the president of the Pandoran Development Authority (PANDA), a group of private sector leaders with civic action interests in the Southeast Asian republic of Pandora.

Portrays the high cost and high risks of Korea.

This two-part case is based on the history of South Korean development in the 1960s and 1970s.

Illustrates a typical situation of a developing country where privatization or commercialization of public authority has taken place. Students must search for ways to balance useful market forces with comprehensive government planning.

This finely woven case takes place in Marinesia and depicts the joint efforts of an overseas cooperation agency and a government aid agency to investigate the pollution of the Manzana River, which

This teaching note accompanies the Mikhukhu People case, which is available from the Kennedy School of Government, and it demonstrates how to determine the mission of a nonprofit organization amid shifting political circumstances and market demands.

This teaching note is provided to emphasize the importance of occasionally reassessing the ability of an organization to fulfill the needs of the clients it serves in the face of changing circumsta

When an aid worker arrives in remote Nepal, she discovers that local politics of ethnicity, gender and caste may be incompatible with the ideals of the development agency.

Run Before You Get Shot Down is a case about cross cultural communication to manage conflicts that arise in international development projects.

A skeptical consultant sets out to evaluate a rural development project and discovers it to be a genuine success, then ponders how to analyze its strengths and write a report that will help similar initiatives gain support.

Yumeko Shirooka is a consultant hired by the Japanese Ministry of Foreign Affairs to evaluate development activities in China.

Conflict erupts when the Catholic Church seeks to reclaim a building that has housed a popular public school for almost fifty years based on a Hungarian law requiring localities to return all property to local religious orders. The case also prompts analysis of how local governments are caught between the dictates of nationally driven policy or regulation and the specific, unique needs of their own communities.

This short, engaging case spurs class discussion about the role of community-based interest groups and the pressures they exert on local governments and public executives.

A development project leads a rural Philippine village into setting up a cooperative to build a fish sanctuary. Farmers and fishermen fall out over raising the necessary capital, leaving the village in disharmony and the project facing death.

This case offers students an opportunity to discuss rural development.